David Murphy

Husband, Father, Coder, Developer, Manager, Author, School Governor, and organiser of @CodeCumbria.

Documentation Driven Development

I’m by no means the first to propose this approach: I first heard the phrase “Readme Driven Development” from Tom Preston-Werner in 2010, and there he referenced Documentation Driven Development:

It’s important to distinguish Readme Driven Development from Documentation Driven Development. RDD could be considered a subset or limited version of DDD.

A quick google(v.) gives me various results for “documentation driven development”:

…and that’s just from the first page of results!

So lets be clear: I’m not claiming to have invented anything here; I’m just distilling the various sources into my own thoughts.

I recently got around to reading The Year Without Pants by Scott Berkun, which details his actually-more-than-a-year working for Automattic. When he was describing a general workflow for updating WordPress.com, this caught my attention:

Write a launch announcement and a support page. Most features are announced to the world after they go live on WordPress.com . But long before launch, a draft launch announcement is written. This sounds strange. How can you write an announcement for something that doesn’t exist? The point is that if you can’t imagine a compellingly simple explanation for customers, then you don’t really understand why the feature is worth building. Writing the announcement first is a forcing function. You’re forced to question if your idea is more exciting for you as the maker than it will be for your customer. If it is, rethink the idea or pick a different one.

This reminded me of Tom Preston-Werner’s approach, and set me thinking about the problem again.

A README file or launch announcement (or release note) are user facing, but users aren’t our only audience. If writing those things first help us distil our thoughts about what we are going to deliver to our users, then doing the same thing for our commit messages or – taking it to the extreme – comments will help us stay focused too. This can be particularly relevant when fixing bugs/issues/defects, as you will generally go into them with a clear idea of what you are going to do to address them.

Of course, just like TDD isn’t always practical – e.g., exploratory spikes – so too can DDD not always be used. Nor should your documentation be set in stone: good documentation lives and breathes alongside the code.

1 Comment

  1. I found this while I was working at Automattic. It wasn’t referred to much, but it clearly has strong similarities to what Automattic was doing at the time.

    http://www.allthingsdistributed.com/2006/11/working_backwards.html

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